Evolutionary Feminism

Updated References for Feminists
Using Various Media Outlets to Keep
Up
With Our Swift Moving Culture
Around
the Planet.


Op-Ed Contributor
My So-Called Wife
By SANDRA TSING LOH
Published: January 23, 2010
Pasadena, Calif.
I am stricken with the peculiar curse of being a 21st-century woman who makes more than the man she’s living with — first with a husband for 13 years and now with a new partner. It’s an increasingly common situation, according to a recent Pew study that found that the proportion of American marriages in which the wife makes more money rose to 22 percent in 2007 from 4 percent in 1970.
Read more...


A Combat Role, and Anguish, Too

By Damien Cave
The New York Times
October 31, 2009
For Vivienne Pacquette, being a combat veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder means avoiding phone calls to her sons, dinner out with her husband and therapy sessions that make her talk about seeing the reds and whites of her friends’ insides after a mortar attack in 2004

Read more...


The Nuns’ Story
Maureen Dowd
Op-Ed Columnist
Once, in the first grade, I was late for class.
I started crying in the schoolyard, terrified to go in and face the formidable Sister Hiltruda.
Read more...


The Mismeasure of Woman

By Joanne Limpman
The New York Times Op-ed
October 23, 2009
FINALLY! I hear we're all living in a women's world now.
For the first time, women make up half the work force. The Shriver Report, out just last week, found that mothers are the major breadwinners in 40 percent of families. We have a female speaker of the House and a female secretary of state. Thirty-two women have served as governors. Thirty-eight have served as senators. Four out of eight Ivy League presidents are women.
Great news, right? Well, not exactly. In fact, it couldn’t be more spectacularly misleading.
Read more...


Rethinking the Older Woman-Younger Man Relationship
The New York Times - Fashion & Style
October 14, 2009

OVER the transom the other day came an urgent “Cougar Alert”: There is a new book out, and this one distinguishes the real cougar, a confident, strong, single woman over 40, from the comically desperate predator-seductress depicted in television shows like “Cougar Town,” one of the latest products of Hollywood’s obsession with the older woman.
Read more...


Health Insurance Reform Is Essential for Women
Nancy Pelosi, October 8th, 2009

 


The Choice Myth
By Judith Warner
The New York Times blog
October 8th, 2009
Last week, The Washington Post ran a front-page story that said most stay-at-home moms aren’t S.U.V.-driving, daily yoga-doing, latte-drinking white, upper-middle-class women who choose to leave their high-powered careers to answer the call to motherhood. Instead, they are disproportionately low-income, non-college educated, young and Hispanic or foreign-born; in other words, they are women whose horizons are greatly limited and for whom the cost of child care, very often, makes work not a workable choice at all.

Read more...


Group Resists Korean Stigma for Unwed Mothers

By Choe Sang-Hun
The New York Times
October 7th, 2009
SEOUL, South Korea
Four years ago, when she found that she was pregnant by her former boyfriend, Choi Hyong-sook considered abortion.
But after she saw the little blip of her baby’s heartbeat on ultrasound images, she could not go through with it.

Read more...


The Pink Recovery
Time Magazine
August 24, 2009
by Christopher Caldwell
Men are paying a higher price in this recession than women.
Perhaps that's fair.

Read more...


Women at Risk
By Bob Herbert
The New York Times
Published, August 7, 2009

“I actually look good. I dress good, am clean-shaven, bathe, touch of cologne — yet 30 million women rejected me,” wrote George Sodini in a blog that he kept while preparing for this week’s shooting in a Pennsylvania gym in which he killed three women, wounded nine others and then killed himself. We’ve seen this tragic ritual so often that it has the feel of a formula. A guy is filled with a seething rage toward women and has easy access to guns. The result: mass slaughter
Read more...


Teacher, Can We Leave Now? No.
Op-Ed Columnist, The New York Times
by Thomas L. Friedman
published July 18, 2009
“When a girl gets educated here and then becomes a mother, she will be much less likely to let her son become a militant or insurgent,” he added. “And she will have fewer children. When a girl learns how to read and write, one of the first things she does is teach her own mother. The girls will bring home meat and veggies, wrapped in newspapers, and the mother will ask the girl to read the newspaper to her and the mothers will learn about politics and about women who are exploited.”

Read more...


An Advocate for Women
An Editorial from The New York Times
June 30th, 2009
Domestic violence is a serious law enforcement and public health problem affecting as many as one in four women in this country. Yet Washington has devoted too little attention to reducing domestic violence and sexual assaults generally. We welcome President Obama’s decision to create a new post, White House adviser on violence against women, and his appointment of a seasoned advocate for victims to fill it.

Read more...


June 29, 2009, 6:11 am

The Great ‘He-cession’
The New York Times
June 29, 2009
Today’s idea: The recession — brought on by risky macho behavior — is hastening the decline of men as job sectors favoring women remain relatively unscathed. “We have no precedent for a world after the death of macho,” an article says. But that is what lies ahead.

Read more...


Babe, set and match:
Why looks count for more than talent when
Wimbledon decides which girls will play on Centre Court

Daily Mail
By Emily Andrews and Colin Fernandez
Last updated at 9:02 AM on 29th June 2009

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Iran’s Second Sex
By Roger Cohen
The New York Times
Published: June 26, 2009
From Day 1, Iran’s women stood in the vanguard. Their voices from rooftops were loudest, and their defiance in the streets boldest.
“Stand, don’t run,” Nazanine told me as the baton-wielding police charged up handsome Vali Asr avenue on the day after the fraudulent election. She stood.

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Challenging Sex Taboos, With Help From the Koran
By Robert F. Worth
The New York Times
Published: June 5th, 2009

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates

WEDAD LOOTAH does not look like a sexual activist. A Muslim and a native Emirati, she wears a full-length black niqab — with only her brown eyes showing through narrow slits — and sprinkles her conversation with quotes from the Koran .
Read more...


Backlash: Women Bullying Women at Work
By Mickey Meece
The New York Times
Published: May 9, 2009
YELLING, scheming and sabotaging: all are tell-tale signs that a bully is at work, laying traps for employees at every pass.

Read more...


Women, Extremism and Two Key States

Published: April 14, 2009
There have been two recent reminders of the cost of extremism. In Afghanistan, President Hamid Karzai signed a law that effectively sanctions marital rape. In Pakistan, a video surfaced of the Taliban in the Swat Valley publicly flogging a young woman screaming for mercy. Pakistan’s government compounded the indignity on Monday by giving in to Taliban demands and formally imposing Shariah law on the region.
Read more...



January 16, 2007, The New York Times, "51% of Women Are Now Living Without Spouse, by Sam Roberts.

"For what experts say is probably the first time, more American women are living without a husband than with one, according to a New York Times analysis of census results.
"In 2005, 51 percent of women said they were living without a spouse, up from 35 percent in 1950 and 49 percent in 2000.
"Coupled with the fact that in 2005 married couples became a minority of all American households for the first time, the trend could ultimately shape social and workplace policies, including the ways government and employers distribute benefits.
"William H. Frey, a demographer with the Brookings Institution, a research group in Washington, described the shift as a "a clear tipping point, reflecting the culmination of post-1960 trends associated with greater independence and more flexible lifestyles for women."
"For better or worse, women are less dependent on men or the institution of marriage,: Dr. Frey said. 'Younger women understand this better, and are preparing to live longer parts of their lives alone or with nonmarried partners. For many older boomer and senior women, the institution of marriage did not hold the promise they might have hoped for, growing up in an 'Ozzie and Harriet era.'"

The female dependence continues to diminish here in America as elsewhere around the planet in the industrialized nations. The planet can only benefit from the "nurturers" taking control of their lives and the destiny of their progeny. The only enemy that this trends has is the de-evolved, knuckle-crawling males and the females who want to remain where they are because they realize that having a "man provide everything" for them is the greatest thing since sliced-bread.

January 4, 2007

For those of you living under a rock, Ms. Nancy Peolosi has been named Speaker of the U.S. House.

Ms. Peolosi has a YouTube account in which she placed an interview she had with TV personality Barbara Walters. The YouTube interview was placed online on December 13, 2006. Below is the link to Ms. Polosi's YouTube page for your reference, and also below, I have placed a small note that I sent to the speaker under the interview with Ms. Walters.

Ms. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the U.S. House, YouTube "Channel."

Of the 4,000 or so mammals on planet Earth, only chimpanzees and humans form alliances to wage violence against their fellow species. Only the males of both species engage in violent organized violence.

We've getting closer to the day when this planet is not at war. Congrats to you Ms. Pelosi, and let's get this country moving again.

William A. Spriggs
Evolution's Voyage, Colorado

December 29, 2006, The New York Times, EDITORIAL OBSERVER, "Middle School Girls Gone Wild," by Lawrence Downes.

"…The scene is a middle school auditorium, where girls in teams of three or four are bopping to pop songs at a student talent show. Not bopping, actually, but doing elaborately choreographed re-creations of music videos, in tiny skirts or tight shorts, with bare bellies, rouged cheeks and glittery eyes. …They writhe and strut, shake their bottoms, splay their legs, thrust their chests out and in and out again. Some straddle empty chairs, like lap dancers without laps. They don't smile much. Their faces are locked from grim exertion, from all that leaping up and lying down without poles to hold onto. "Don't stop don't stop," sings Janet Jackson, all whispery. "Jerk it like you're making it choke….ohh. I'm so stimulated. Feel so X-rated." The girls spend a lot of time lying on the floor. They are in the sixth, seventh and eight grades.
It is news to no one, not even me, that eroticism in popular culture is a 24-hour, all-you-can-eat buffet, and that many children in their early teens are filling up. The latest debate centers on whether simulated intercourse is an appropriate dance style for the high school gym."

If we read the entry for December 19, 2006 concerning the subject of oral sex and young girls, and the way "sex has changed a lot," we come away with the possibility that we may be in the mist of another sexual revolution that will dwarf the 1960s. They are of course, good things that can come of this -- and bad things that could result. The good news is that sex is the greatest weapon ever "invented" by God to dissipate male aggression.

Get a healthy young male between the ages of 17-25 laid three times a week and the aggressive, risky behavior that males perform in order to gain resources, which attract females for sexual access, dissipates. Trust me, I've been there. (Want proof? Look at automobile insurance rates to cover bachelor males in this age bracket....is it so high because their reflexes are so poor? Or because that is the age of highest risk behavior in the male genome? Risky behavior increases the chances to gain more resources, which in turn, attracts more females because they know the male with more resources is better for her progeny than a poor male with no resources.)

The bad news, of course, is the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases - especially in a nation that does not have universal health care. And of course, the dominant female suffers because her sexual access has been "devalued" by shanks, sluts, easy-women, and whores (that's why these categories have been created). All the more reason why the de-evolved, knuckle-crawling females who support their de-evolved, knuckle-crawling males will do everything in their power to stop such "free sex" practices.

December 17, 2006, The New York Times, OP-ED COLUMNIST, The Good Daughter, in a Brothel, by Nicholas D. Kristof. BATTAMBANG, Cambodia.

"One of the oldest social dichotomies is the one dividing good girls from bad, the madonna for the whore. But in poor countries were sex trafficking and globalization have fostered new forms of slavery, it is the saintly ones -- those who risk leaving their villages to help their families -- who often end up as whores."

Over and over again, we are reminded that poverty is the engine that drives prostitution.

December 17th, 2006

Time magazine has a VIEWPOINT by James C. Dobson, of Focus on the Family & Colorado Springs fame. This one is commenting on: Two Mommies Is One Too Many: Mary Cheney is starting a family. Let's hope she doesn't start a trend, in Time magazine issue, December 18, 2006, p. 123.

He argues that two mommies can not supply the missing element of the father. That "maleness is taught (through culture and nurture) and that boys are not born with this "maleness." He points by citing "30 years of social-science evidence" that children do best on every measure of well-being when raised my a mother and father. He cites specifically, Dr. Kyle Pruett of Yale Medical School in his book Fatherneed: Why Father Care Is as Essential as Mother Care for Your Child.

"Pruett says dads are critically important simply because "fathers do not mother. Psychology today explained in 1996 that "fatherhood turns out to be a complex and unique phenomenon with hugh consequences for the emotional and intellectual growth of children…According to educational psychologist Carol Gilligan, mother tend to stress sympathy, grace and care to their children, while fathers accent justice, fairness and duty. Moms give a child a sense of hopefulness; dads provide a sense of right and wrong and its consequences.

Mr. Dobson ends his essay with the statement:

"The traditional family, supported by more that 5,000 years of human experience, is still the foundation on which the well-being of future generations depends."

I suppose, I should be thankful that Mr. Dobson goes back 5,000 years. Of course, my good man, God's wisdom has placed the evolutionary mechanisms in motion for over 100,000 years now, (and I could argue many millions more), and 90% of the evolutionary community agrees that the "manly" acts of protecting the newly discovered concept of staying in one place to live off the resources of domestic animals and plants goes back to around 10,000. It wasn't until then that "maleness" helped to accumulate resources in which to attract the female and to insure that the female would pick him and then we see the evolution of "traditional families."

What Mr. Dobson, (and the de-evolved, knuckle-crawling conservative females that support him) are really selling is that the male is on top with the female being submissive to the male's every wish. This is the foundation upon with Evangelical Christianity is built; Mr. Dobson is forgetting to insert that into his essay because it's a "given" to the faithful and not to the unwashed masses. . It's not "that birth and adoption are the purview of married heterosexual couples" or that when this "Divine Plan" of God's is in place, that children "have the best opportunity to thrive," it's"when the male rules, and the female submits" that Mr. Dobson is selling in his essay. That is what he means by "traditional marriage." Unfettered female choice is not the goal as it is in evolutionary feminism.

Mr. Dobson needs a quick lesson in evolutionary thought: "It's not -- "the survival of the fittest" that most Evangelical Christians hold dear to their hearts, it's "WHO LEAVES BEHIND THE MOST CHILDREN," Mr. Dobson. That happens when Christian "do-gooders" keep their hands and eyes out of the individual's bedroom and all females have unfettered choice.

December 17th, 2006

David Brook, the de-evolved, knuckle-crawling, "I want to be a macho-man" conservative writer with The New York Times, had a piece today about the general angst of magazine articles found in 2006 America. In one of the articles he mentioned, he listed this article of particular interest to me: "Are You There God? It's Me, Monica," How nice girls go so casual about oral sex, by Caitlin Flanagan, in the January/February 2006, The Atlantic Online edition. Basically, Ms. Flanagan is recording a cultural shift in the sexual mores of young females in American society today (All without any empirical evidence, I might add). But if proven true, I find it most interesting. Here are a few notable quotes:

"Nowadays girls don't consider oral sex in the least exotic -- nor do they even consider it to be sex. It's just "something to do." A friend who attended a leadership conference for girls from some of the country's top schools told me, "Friendships haven't changed a bit since our day. But Sex has changed a lot." One of the teachers, from an eastern boarding school, told the students that when she was young, in the 1960s, oral sex was considered far more intimate than intercourse. The kids hooted at the notion. "It's like licking a lollipop," one pretty girl from a prestigious girls' school said, flipping her hair in the ancient gesture of teenage certainty. "It's no big deal."
"Never bring a boy to your bedroom," (my mother) told me afterward. "Why not?"..There was a fumbling for words, and then an answer: "Because he might go to school and tell other boys what your comforter looks like." But even in my teenage snit I understood what she was talking about: not the comforter but my reputation (emphasis mine). Not the boy himself (who was a very nice person -- anyone could tell it just from meeting him) but the immutable truth about boys: They want most what we keep private. When it's known, it's lessened."(emphasis mine again).

This is really important people. If you read the darkened highlights of my emphasises, it leads us to a crossroad in inter-group conflict regarding sexual transmissions of genes. It is at this point that a group decides for woman who is a Madonna or Whore, Saint or Slut. The basis, of course, is that if sexual access is given away, then it "lessens" the value of the sexual access, thus reducing the value of a male's commitment. It puts a dent in the "good" girl's return on her parental investment. She has to "put out" more in order to make the male committed. Or at least, that is the "group consensus" at this time in history, and location on the planet. It's the cultural norms, stupid. And they "must be obeyed."

"We've made a world for our girls in which the pornography industry has become increasingly mainstream, in which Planned Parenthood's response to the oral-sex craze has been to set up a help line, in which the forces of feminism have worked relentlessly to erode the patriarchy -- which, despite its manifold evils, held that providing for the sexual safety of young girls was among its primary reasons for existence. And there are America's girls: experienced beyond their modesty, adrift in one of the most explicitly sexualized cultures in the history of the world. Here are America's girls: on their knees."

Well, that's a bit of a dramatic ending to the essay, but all that it gives us is anecdotal evidence to a cultural shift taking place. My personal belief is that because of the internet, and it "show everything that is happening between humans" in the privacy of their bedrooms, it is creating this shift. Somehow, observing other humans "doing it," is not "dirty" anymore, but, as Jared Diamond's book tell's us" "It's fun." And perhaps, because of this, we are turning our back on our aggressive, chimpanzee connections and preferring to "make love, and not war," as the bonobos demonstrate. If so, it's about time; aggression and war is nothing but wasted energy.

December 9th, 2006, The New York Times, "Jeane Kirkpatrick, Reagan's Envoy, Dies, by Time Weiner.

"Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, the Reagan administration's first United Nations ambassador and a beacon of neconservative thought who helped guide American military, diplomatic and covert action from 1981 to 1985, died Thursday at her home in Bethesda, Md. She was 80.
"Ms. Kirkpatrick first entered Mr. Reagan's inner circle on the strength of a 10,000-word article, "Dictatorships and Bouble Standards," drew a bright line between right-wing pro-American governments and left-wing anti-American ones.

"Traditional authoritarian governments," she argued, "are less repressive than revolutionary autocracies." She said it was an historic mistake for the United States to have shied away from dictators like the Somozas in Nicaragua and the Shah of Iran. If they served American interests, she asserted, they were defensible."

Ok, so why did I put this article as a reference? I did it to remind evolutionary feminists that YOUR ENEMY on the road to equality is not de-evolved, knuckle-crawling males, but de-evolved, knuckle-crawling males AND THE FEMALES WHO SUPPORT THEM BY THEIR WORDS AND DEEDS. Do you understand the basics of what this woman wrote about that endeared her to the Reagan administration? That is was ok to support governments that destroy democracies in their countries as long as THEY SERVED AMERICAN INTERESTS. What is needed here is a translation of what American interests are all about. It's about greed and the protection the property of the corporate elites who can't seem to make enough money.

But it also means that this female, Ms. Kirkpatrick, would sell her fellow sisters as long as it supported her fellow upper-echelon, hierarchical elites. After all, its still about passing one's genes into the next generation, and if push comes to shove, it will be her genes and her fellow high ranking females. I have decieded to give her and other females with similar status: MACHO MOMMIES.

December 1, 2006, The New York Times, "Sex Abuse of Girls Is Stubborn Scourge in Africa." by Sharon LaFraniere, "In much of the continent, child advocates say, perpetrators are shielded by the traditionally low status of girls, a lingering view that sexual abuse should be dealt with privately, and justice systems that constitute obstacle courses for victims. Data is sparse and sexual violence is notoriously underreported." "...Researchers cite various reasons that abuse is so common: poverty.." "...But, ultimately,...the vast gap between the status of men and boys and that of women and girls explains much of the climate of relative tolerance. "...it would be gender inequality,"

This is a very tough article to read, especially the part about the sodomy of a little 5 year old and the medical complications that followed.

November 26, 2006, Los Angeles Times, "China's new wealth leaving women behind: Some blame centuries-old sexism or the inequalities brought by Western-style capitalism for the lack of female business leaders." by Robin Fields.
"...Women are increasingly unequal partners in china's new prosperity, trailing behind men as business owners and chief executives...Some blame traditional Chinese chauvinism, peeking out from under a thin veil of egalitarian communist rhetoric, for holding women back....Others say Western-style capitalism has brought Western-style inequities."

November 19, 2006, The Denver Post, "Women Nurture a World of Change, by Cindy Rodriguex, STYLE section, page L1.
"Pop quiz: Which gender buys 68 percent of all books in the U.S.? Who makes up the majority of students in American Colleges? Who makes 80 percent of buying decisions in homes? The answer to all of the above: women.
"Michael J. Silverstein, a national expert on consumerism, said it succinctly in a recent Sunday New York Times Article: 'We are perhaps on the first step to a matriarchal society; women will earn more money than men if current trends continue by 2028.'"

November 19, 2006, The Associated Press, "No Escape But The Fire," by Alisa Tang. Found in The Denver Post, Nov. 19, 2006.
Tag Line: " Afgan women's powerlessness is driving attempts at self-immolation." Some quotes:
"...Desperate to escape domestic violence, forced marriage and hardship, scores of women across Afganistan each year are committing suicide by fire. While some gains have been made since the fall of the Taliban five years ago, life remains bleak for many Afghan women in the conservative and violence-plagued country, and suicide is a common escape.
"... An estimated 60 to 80 percent of Afghan women and girls, according to a recent report from Woman-kind, an international women's rights group. More than half of Afghan women are married before they turn 16 and many girls are married to men decades older, the report said."

November 18, 2006, The New York Times, OP-ED COLUMNIST, Maureen Dowd, "Squeaker of the House."

Ms. Dowd is my almost-favorite feminist writer because she is fearless as she takes a swipe all matters conservative - and that means her own political party. Here she addresses the newly elected Nancy Pelosi's first political move.

"Nancy Pelosi's first move, after the Democratic triumph, was to throw like a girl. Women get criticized in the office for acting on relationships and past slights rather than strategy, so Madame Speaker wasted no time making her first move based on relationships and past slights rather than strategy."

November 11, 2006, The New York Times, "Then and Now, Female Soldiers Just Do Their Jobs," EDITORIAL OBSERVER, by Maura J. Casey.
"One of my most prized possessions is a set of World War II dog tags. They are inscribed with my mother's name and serial number: Jane I. Murray, A-218847. She enlisted in the Women's Army Corps at 21, determined to get as near to the front as possible. She go no closer to combat than Fort Riley, Kan. Her Army year became her one great adventure before returning to marry and have six children in seven years, a daunting task for which er warrior's ethos probably came in handy."

November 11, 2006, The New York Times, "Drapes of Wrath," OP-ED COLUMNIST, by Maureen Dowd.
My almost favorite feminist, Maureen Dowd, sheds her great cultural understanding of the mid-term, 2006 national elections.
"...This will be known as the year macho policies failed -- mainly because it was macho politics by marshmallow men. Voters were sick of phony swaggering, blustering and bellicosity, absent competency and accountability. They were ready to trade in the deadbeat Daddy party for the sheltering Mommy party.

"...A recent study found that the testosterone of American men has been dropping for 20 years, but in Republican Washington, it was running amok, and not in a good way. Men who had refused to go to an untenable war themselves were now refusing to find an end to another untenable was that they had recklessly started."

Items below horizontal rule are old news items being updated by me...(W.A.S.)


November 8, 2006, The New York Times, Election Coverage Still a Men's Club, by Alessandra Stanley.

"History was all over the screen, except on the anchor desks and panels of experts, where every news division, even CNN, seemed to have sent out an inter-office memo that said, 'stag.'

"And that was perhaps the biggest contribution Katie Couric, the CBS anchor, made on election night: she stood out as one anchor not wearing a necktie.

"It could be that men still dominate on election night because politics is like the N.F.L.: it's always two guys in the booth doing the play by play, while women cover the sidelines. Maybe it's the women who avoid signing on to a lifetime of covering politics: the campaign trail is fattening, and requires far too much math.

"More likely, the election night throwback to the days of Brylcreem and cigarette smoke comes from a confluence of overconfidence and insecurity."

Our culture is slowing moving, but it is moving. Ms. Couric appearance as a news anchor with swiftly lead to other female voices on important matters. For example, in Muslin courntires, we've seen the female reporters not wearing head scarfs. This will have an major impact on younger females as they overcome objections of their parents for not wearing said restricive clothing item.

November 7, 2006, The New York Times, "Violence Against Palestinian Women Is Increasing, Study Says, by Steven Erlanger.

"JERUSALEM, Nov 6 -- Discriminatory laws, traditional practices and a severe shortage of emergency shelters combine to perpetuate violence against women by their family members and intimate partners in the Palestinian territories, according to a report to be issued on Tuesday by Human Rights Watch, a New York-based watchdog group."

The report also notes that given traditions of male authority and the enclosed nature of Palestinian communities, it is difficult for a femal victim to seek redress or help with any guarantee of privacy. Those who complain to the police or the courts sometimes put themselves in more danger from an embarrassed family or clan. The system "prioritizes the reputations of their families in the community over their own well-being and lives."

Once again, we see that in groups struggling to survive, group identity becomes more important and the individual. More study needs to be made on this subject.

October 29, 2006, The New York Times, "Iraqis See the Little Things Fade Away in War's Gloom, by Sabrina Tavernise.

"BAGHDAD, Oct. 28 - The things the women missed were almost too small to notice at first.

"Simple numbers and dates began to elude their memories. They were hugging their children less. Past pleasure, eating and listening to music, began to feel flat. They were shouting at their husbands like army commanders.

Their stories began with a familiar theme: the shrinking lives of middle-class families in the capital. Social clubs have emptied out. Weddings have been sparsely attended. But as the circle has become smaller, and as they focus intensely on just staying alive, they said, even the basics are being stripped away.

"All the elements of society have been dismantled, " said Fawsia Abdul al-Attiy, a sociologist and professor at Baghdad University. 'You are afraid because you are a woman, a man, a Sunni, a Shiite, a Kurd. All these thing start to change society.'"

I want you evolutionists to understand that what is happening in Iraq, is what our early ancestors must have endured in our evolution. Survival first, then expansion of interests in other matters when the fear of extinction passes - which is what our societies are based upon. You can not have a renaissance if you are trying to stay alive and all that is built is wasted with warfare.

October 28th, 2006, The New York Times, OP-ED COLUMNIST, "Give the Vixens the Day Off," by John Tierney.

Mr. Tierney, who comments on culture in general, has discovered that women have "suddenly discovered that looking sexy" is a new development in the culture. Sorry, old boy, but females have always known "what men want." The biology behind the culture has not changed, but the culture (brought on by the internet) that makes it visable has changed (especially about sex) dramatically.

"In principle, I have nothing against women in vinyl thigh-high boots, leather corsets, French maid micro-dresses or dominatrix gear. If American women are determined to set aside one day a year to go public with their inner vixen, I believe it is men's solemn duty to respect their wishes. But should that day be Halloween?"

(Also see Dec., 17th 2006 entry above, Mr. David Brooks, and the entry about oral sex and young females in 2006)

October 27, 2006, The New York Times, WORLD BRIEFING/ASIA, India: Domestic Abuse Law Takes Effect. By REUTERS.

"A new law went into effect that for the first time provides women protection against domestic abuse from their husbands or live-partners, including physical, sexual, verbal, emotional or economic abuse…The law will provide women a share of the abuser's property and salary, as well as medical damages. It also provides for the appointment of protection officers and private service providers to help abused women get medical and legal aid and a safe place to stay. The most empowering clause gives a woman the right to remain in her husband's home, or in a shared family household."

October 15, 2006, The Denver Post, "Waiting on Baby," by Karen Augé, Denver Post Staff Writer.

TAG LINE OVER PHOTO:
92 OUT OF 1,000: That's the rate of babies born to girls ages 15-17 in Huerfano County in 2004. In the state, it was 24.8 births for every 1,000 girls the same age. So what's the rural southern Colorado county doing to combat its problem?

"Teen pregnancy is a huge problem in much of rural Colorado, but nowhere more so than in Huerfano County, home to Walsenburg.

Though teen pregnancy is stereo-typed as a byproduct of broken urban families, the reality is that teen pregnancy is a rural scourge, one that in some small towns has become as much a part of local tradition as homecoming parties.

There are no student health centers in Huerfano County's two high schools or in Lake County schools, where the teen birthrate is 65 per 1,000 is state's second-highest.

Teens don't just have babies because they don't have condoms or they don't know any better…they get pregnant - subconsciously - because their friends have babies, or they see as a way out of an unhappy childhood, or because their own moms were teen mothers.

What is the motivation for a young person in a town where their mother and their grandmother and everyone around them is not going to college and there are teen parents as far as the eye can see?"

This is a really great, in-depth story about a small rural town in Colorado and the impact that the local environment has on the young female population there. You should check out the whole story. You should check out the whole story has to what the town is trying to do about its "problem."

It not about telling them to "just say no."

October 5, 2006, The New York Times, OP-ED COLUMNIST, David Brooks, A Tear in Our Fabric.

The de-evolved, knuckle-crawling, "I want to be a macho man" conservative, David Brooks writes about the Mark Foley political scandal and trys to spin it.

Mr. Brooks attempts to teach us that society turns on moral universes, and that there are different moral universes. As an example, he tells us that The Vagina Monologues is praised why Congressman Foley is despised and asks why.

Because the Vagina Monologue:

"Audiences are reacting to the exuberant voice of the young girl, who narrates the scene. They're embracing - at least in the fantasy world of the theater - a moral code that's been called expressive individualism. Under this code, the core mission of life is to throw off the shackles of social convention and to embark on a journey of self-discovery. Behavior is not wrong if it feels good and doesn't hurt anybody else. Sex is not wrong so long as it is done by mutual consent.

Of course, Mr. Brooks is being facetious, and like every true de-evolved, knuckle-crawling conservative slides right into the "immoral, cosmopolitan culture" of the 1970s and 1980s spin that conservatives have used for the past 20 years.

He then leads us into what he calls, "the older code" of behavior in which people seems to be returning (according to him) to judge the Foley affair.

"But the really import of the Foley story is Foley's act itself. In a country filled with parents looking for a way to raise their children in a morally disordered environment, Foley's act is just one more symptom of a contagious disease.

In the long run, the party that benefits from events like the Foley scandal will be the party that defines the core threats to the social fabric, and emerges as the most ardent champion of moral authority."

Wrong, Mr. Brooks. You should have written that the party that will suffer the most will be the party that covered up the scandal, not the act itself. Do you remember the Catholic Church's cover-up of all those pedophile acts? What you need to recognize what you are doing - which is to cover up a powerful male hierarchy and the actions that they have taken because you mistaken believe that the society as a whole would be better off then if harm came to this powerful infrastructure.

Ask yourself this question, Mr. Brooks: Do I benefit by deflecting blame away from this powerful, male-dominated, elite super-structure?

September 19, 2006, The New York Times, CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK, by Ginia Bellafante, "Radio Programming for Women, Whatever That Means."

"Earlier this year Goria Steinem, assisted by Jan Fonda and a handful of other prominent women in the worlds of finance and entertainment, created GreenStone Media to develop and distribute radio programming for women.

Though radio's popularity has receded for adults across the board in recent years, it has declined notably among women, a matter Ms. Steinem has come to regard with some trepidation. Promoting her new venture at a conference in Minneapolis this summer, she lamented even that few women are now listening to so-called adult contemporary radio. What this implies for feminism's ambitions isn't certain, unless you begin to imagine that the shrinking number of women inclined to set their alarm clocks to a station favoring Justin Timberlake correlates somehow to diminished odds for a Hillary Rodham Clinton presidency."

I have no comment on this other than a woman has as much right as a man to fail at any business venture they choose to start.


September 19, 2006, The New York Times, "It's Muslim Boy Meets Girl, Yes, but Please Don't Call It Dating," By Neil MacFarquhar.

CHICAGO - So here's the thing about speed dating for Muslims.

Many American Muslims - or at least those bent on maintaining certain conservative traditions - equate anything labeled "dating" with hellfire, no matter how short a time is involved. Hence the wildly popular speed dating sessions at the largest annual Muslim conference in North America were given an entirely more respectable label. They were called the "matrimonial banquet." "If we called it speed dating, it will end up with real dating," Shamshad Hussain, one of the organizers, grimacing.

Basically, for conservative Muslims, dating is a euphemism for premarital sex. Anyone who partakes risks being considered morally louche, with their marriage prospects dimming accordingly, particularly young women.

This is a very interesting article to me because it shows the bending of old, iron-clad social norms attempting to meet the new social orders and customs. The old, conservative ways hanging on, yet trying to accommodate the new. The old ways always lose, especially in a more prosperous environment where communications flourish.

September 18, 2006, The New York Times,
"Institutions Hinder Female Academics, Panel Says, by Cornelia Dean.

"Women in science and engineering are hindered not by lack of ability but by bias and 'outmoded institutional structures' in academia, an expert panel reported today.

"Unless a deeper talent pool is tapped, it will be difficult for our country to maintain our competitiveness in science and engineering,' the panel's chairwoman, Donna E. Shalala, said at a news conference at which the report, 'Beyond Bias and Barriers: Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering,' was made public.

"If there are any cognitive differences, the report says, they are small and irrelevant. In any event, the much-studied gender gap in math performance has all but disappeared as more and more girls enroll in demanding classes. Even among very high achievers, the gap is narrowing, the panelists said."

Within a few generations, the female will take preeminence in our American culture, and it is my strong belief that they will help to steer this country and our planet toward a world at peace. It won't happen tomorrow, or the next day, but it is coming. After all, peace is best for children and all living things.

For, I've been to the mountaintop and have seen the future.

September 6, 2006, The New York Times, OP-ED COLUMNIST, Maureen Dowd, "New Themes for the Same Old Songs."

My almost favorite feminist writer chimes in about the upcoming elections, G. W. Bush, Dick Cheney, "Rummy," and Katie Couric. Some notable quotes follow:

W., Dick Cheney and Rummy are on a campaign to scare Americans into believing that limp-wristed Democrats will curtsy to Islamic radicals and Iranian tyrants, just as Chamberlain bowed to Hilter, and that only the über-manly Republicans can keep totalitarianism, fascism and the Al Qaeda "threat to civilization" at bay. If they were women, their rhetoric would be described with adjectives like shrill, strident, illogical and hysterical. But since they are men, we'll just call it Churchill envy.

Actually, the minue Katie Couric was given a $15 million paycheck to read from a teleprompter for 15 or 20 minutes a night, women won. Women have been doing that at the BBC and on American cable stations for years, and for a lot less dough. Jackie Robinson represented a revolution; Katie Couric represented a promotion.

August 26, 2006, The New York Times, "Clergywomen Find Hard Path to Bigger Pulpit," By Neela Banerjee

"In the 18 years since her ordination, the Rev. Elaine Puckett has wrestled with whether she should be in the pulpit at all. When she left divinity school, Ms. Puckett, a United Methodist, thought that some day she might lead a large congregation in her hometown, Atlanta. Instead, she has shuttle between jobs as an associate pastor on someone else's staff or as the leader of a small congregation fighting to survive. In contrast, the men she was ordained with, for the most part, have moved on to run bigger churches.

Women now make up 51 percent of the students in divinity school. But in the mainline Protestant churches that have been ordaining women for decades, women account for only a small percentage - about 3 percent, according to one survey by a professor at Duke University - of pastors who lead large congregations, those with average Sunday attendance over 350."

Not much to add here except that the evolutionary community and I believe that religions around the world are dominated by males (and in particular, bachelor males) that evolved from the social dominant practice of primogenitor. According to the practice, the first-born son inherited all of the property and wealth, leaving the second, third, and so on, sons without any wealth, and thus the inability to attract females. Since they were generally educated and urban males, the Church was a perfect place where these males could find meaning, authority, and safety from the cruel world outside the walls of the various religions. This "cruelty" often involved going to war that the nobles found necessary, and with it came the very good possibility of getting killed. Make prayer, not war….

July 9, 2006, The New York Times, THE NEW GENDER DIVIDE, by Tamar Lewin, "At Colleges, Women Are Leaving Men in the Dust."

If you print this article out, it comes to 12 pages, but it can be boiled down to a dozen or so paragraphs. Some of which I have placed below. It's an important observational piece, and I feel that it should be part of your citation references.

"…men now make up only 42 percent of the nation's college students. And with sex discrimination fading and their job opportunities widening, women are coming on much stronger, often leapfrogging the men to the academic finish.

"The boys are about where they were 30 years ago, but the girls are just on a tear, doing much, much better," said Tom Mortenson, a senior scholar at the Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education in Washington.

"Over all, the differences between blacks and whites, rich and poor, dwarf the differences between men and women within any particular group," says Jacqueline King, a researcher for the American Council on Education's Center for Policy Analysis and the author of the forthcoming report.

"At Harvard, 55 percent of the women graduated with honors this spring, compared with barely half the men. And at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, a public university, women made up 64 percent of this year's graduates, and they got 75 percent of the honors degrees and 79 percent of the highest honors, summa cum laude.

"People keep asking me why this is such a hot topic…It suggested that the heightened concern might in part reflect some people's nervousness about women's achievement…The idea that girls could be ahead is so shocking that they think it must be a crisis for boys, " Ms. Mead said. "I'm troubled by this tone of crisis. Even if you control for the field they're in, boys right out of college make more money than girls, so at the end of the day, is it grades and honors that matter, or something else the boys may be doing?

August 6, 2006, The New York Times, QUESTIONS FOR ANDI ZEISLER, "Pop Goes the Feminist," Interview by Deborah Solomon.

"Q: I see that your magazine, a feminist quarterly based in Oakland, Calif., and devoted to critiquing the sexist slant of pop culture, is celebrating its 10th anniversary with the publication this week of a thick anthology called "BitchFest." Why would you choose to glamorize the unappealing female stereotype of the bitch?

A: When we chose the name, we were thinking, well, it would be great to reclaim the word "bitch" for strong, outspoken women, much the same way that "queer" has been reclaimed by the gay community. That was very much on our minds, the positive power of language reclamation.

Q: What, besides your screaming title, do you think the magazine has contributed to feminist discourse?

A: We've tried to get people to see that pop culture is a critical locus of feminism. Most young girls are not reading Ms. They're watching "The OC" or "veronica Mars." It makes sense for us to talk about those pop-culture products, because those are the conversations that girls are having among themselves. They're not talking about how many seats women have in Congress. They're not talking about public policy."


July 23, 2006, The New York Times, TELEVISION, "ABC Brings 'Ugly Betty' to America. by Matthew Fogel.
Mr. Fogel gives a brief history behind the melodrama, cliffhanger Colombian telenovela that has taken the some countries by storm.(India, Germany, and Russia) What's the appeal here?

July 21, 2006, The New York Times, EDITORIAL, "Young Latinas and a Cry For Help."

"A recent series in the Spanish-language New York newspaper El Diario/La Prensa sheds some light on a mostly overlooked national phenomenon, the misunderstood and endangered young Latina, who represents one of the fastes growing segments of the American population. Hispanic teenage girls attempt suicide more often than any other group. They become mothers at younger ages. They tend not to complete their education. They are plagues by rising drug use and other social problems."

"A federal study found that a startling one in six young Hispanic women had attempted suicide, a rate roughly one and a half times as high as that among non-Hispanic black and white teenage girls."

July 16, 2006, The New York Times, "How to Avoid Honor Killing in Turkey? Honor Suicide, by Dan Bilefsky

"Every few weeks in Batman and the surrounding area in southeast Anatolia, which is poor, rural and deeply influenced by conservative Islam, a young woman tries to take her life. Others have been stoned to death, strangled, shot or buried alive. Their offenses ranged from stealing a glance at a boy to wearing a short skirt, wanting to go to the movies, being raped by a stranger or relative or having consensual sex.

"Hoping to join the European Union, Turkey has tightened the punishment for attacks on women and girls who have had such experiences. But the violence has continued, if by different means: parents are trying to spare their sons from the harsh punishments associated with killing their sisters by pressing the daughters to take their own lives instead.

"Families of disgraced girls are choosing between sacrificing a son to a life in prison by designating him to kill his sister or forcing their daughters to kill themselves…Rather then losing two children, most opt for the latter option.

"Batman (pronounced bot-MON) is a grim and dusty city of 250,000 people where religion is clashing with Turkey's official secularism...

"…When a woman is suspected of engaging in sexual relations out of wedlock, her male relatives convene a family council to decide her sentence. Once news of the family's shame has spread to the community, the family typically rules that it is only through death that its honor can be restored."

I think it best to chime in here on my part and give you my comments. The common local environment that these events share is poverty.

>Poverty forces a family unit into a tight, protective group; the more harsh the environment, the harsher the protection.

>Usually, the protection of the tight, family group is headed by the males because of their physical strength and the importance of the female to protect the infants.

>Part of the protection that the family imposes upon it's self, are "rules of conduct." This can be rules on diet - what and what not to eat. Caution and myths about "the others," such as the "clan over the mountain" or "beyond the sand barriers."

>Since the female has reproductive abilities, the female family member could be impregnated by "the other," and thus, be a living memory of the family's weakness and vulnerability. This could be the origin of "family's 'honor.'" This "mental presence of a living organism of "the other" living inside one of the family member's body can not be tolerated. Thus, very tight control is made to make sure that the young females in the family do not break out of the protective circle.
Conservative religious views on "reproductive behavior of the female" are merely evolved concepts of family protection. The "crisis" evolves when the young female family member views this protective "burga" of behavior as stupid and non-revenant. Which leaves us with the final quote from The New York Times story:

"Young women like Derya, who have previously led protected lives under the rigid moral strictures of their families and Islam, are suddenly finding themselves in the modern Turkey of Internet dating and MTV. The shift can create dangerous tensions, sometimes lethal ones, between their families and the secular values of the republic that the young women seek to embrace."

Subtle differences in this "protective circle" of "family honor" have evolved in our modern societies where the male protector, usually, the father, makes sure that no other male will get the daughter pregnant because the new male in the pictures may deplete the family fortunes through inheritances, and thus harm the family through depletion of resources. This is particularly true in societies that have, and still do practice, primogenitor - the first male born inherits everything.

July 15, 2006, The New York Times, OP-ED COLUMNIST, by Maureen Dowd, "What's Up, Slut?

Ms. Dowd attemtps to tell us that language that once was used to hurt women, changes, morphs, and shifts over time. It is merely the normal passage of language through time. However, I must admit, one of my almost favorite feminist writers.

"After eons of being a summary judgment that a woman is damaged goods, the word slut has shifted into more ambiguous territory. It can still be an insult, especially since there is no pejorative equivalent to suggest that a man has sullied himself with too many sexual partners. Man are players, women are sults, just he way men are tough and women are bitchy."

"..as the anthropologist Helen Fisher puts it, the slur may have lost some sting. The Times's Stephanie Rosenbloom writes that the word has morphed into a term of endearment and teasing..."

February 28, 2006, The New York Times, OP-ED Columinst,
The Happiest Wives, by John Tierney.

Mr. Tierney takes on a difficult subject in that it toches upon modern female attitues about "What makes a women happy with her marriage?"

"But it turns out that an equal division of labor didn't make husbands more affectionate or wives more fulfilled. The wives working outside the home reported less satisfaction with their husbands than did the stay-at-home wives. And among those with outside jobs, the happiest wives, regardless of the family's overall income, were the one whose husbands brought in at least two-thirds of the money.

"Women today expect more help around the home and more emotional engagement from their husbands," Wilcox (of the Uiversity of Virginia) says. "But they still want their husbands to be providers who give them financial security and freedom."

"Similarly, there's a gender gap in enthusiams for some outside jobs. Men are much more willing to take a job that pays a premium in exchange for long hours away from home or the rist of being killed. The extra money doesn't seem as important to women."

The important thing that we evolutionary feminists can take from this article is that not much has changed in the female "choice" of what is the best for the reproductive success of their mating. A female can use a turkey baster, but that would still leave her with child and no one to help.

I orignally created this section in November of 2006, but because of my uneasiness in using links to various news outlets, I sort of let it die. But, since the last entry in January of 2007, the newspaper industry has gone through a period of reconciliation with bloggers and independent web sites like mine who "borrow" news articles from their web platforms. I have always felt that if I directed one of my viewers to their web site, it was to their benefit -- because those sites would be full of advertisments benefiting them.

Most of the news links will be with The New York Times, and other major media outlets.

I hope it all helps moves our understanding of the evolutionary process forward

William A. Spriggs
June 26, 2009


I have decided to create this section of physical paper and online articles (mostly from The New York Times) as an updated reference for feminists whom wish to keep up the the swift passage of our culture. Some of the articles will have to do with culture at various locations on the planet, but mostly will be American in location. There will be dates, titles, authors, and a brief introduction or short direct quote or quotes-- but no links -- You're going to have to do some of the work! William A. Spriggs, Nov. 11, 2006

One of the best refereces for media articles related to feminism is with The New York Times
Click on the link below

ARTICLES ABOUT FEMINIST MOVEMEN T
FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES